Telecast

To broadcast on television, thereby making a work available to an audience.  See also Broadcast, Distribution.

Telefeature

See Made-for-television movie.

Television commercials

Short advertisements that attempt to sell a product or service to the audience, or to persuade them to adopt a favorable view towards some product, institution, candidate, issue, or business.  See also Political spots, Public service announcements, Theater commercials.

Television feature

See Made-for-television movie.

Television promos

See Promos.

Television serial

See Serial (2. Television usage).

Television series

A group of programs created or adapted for television broadcast with a common series title, usually related to one another in subject or another way.  Often, television series appear once a week during a prescribed time slot; however, they may appear with more or less frequency.  Television series are usually created to be open-ended, not with a predetermined number of episodes.  In a fiction series, the programs typically share the same characters and basic themes.

Television specials

Television programs scheduled for one broadcast only.  Examples include variety shows, parades, pageants, contests, award presentations, news coverage of special events, elections, political conventions, holiday programs, etc.

Television trailers

Short advertisements shown on television for a forthcoming movie theater presentation, most commonly a feature film.  May include short segments from the feature advertised.  See also Trailers.

Theater announcements

Non-commercial messages shown to the audience.  See also Announcements, Public service announcements.

Theater commercials

Short advertisements that attempt to sell a product or service to the audience, or to persuade them to adopt a favorable view towards some product, institution, candidate, issue, or business.  See also Political spot, Television commercials.

Theatrical newsreels

See Newsreels.

Theatrical projection print

In AMIM2, a film print restricted to theatrical projection as opposed to flat bed screening.  This is an optional term that describes level of accessibility.  See also Viewing print.

Theatrical serial

See Serial (1. Film usage).

Three-color

A non-specific term for a number of color processes in which the visible spectrum is divided into the three primary colors of red, green, and blue.

Three-color imbibition

A color process used to produce prints by transferring dye that has been soaked up by three matrices (gelatin relief images similar to lithographic printing plates).  The dye is transferred from the matrices to a special type of film.  This process uses three-strip color separation negatives.  The process was introduced by Technicolor in 1932.  See also Three-strip color.

Three-dimensional (3-D)

A film projection process that achieves a three-dimensional effect.  Generally uses two projectors that superimpose two images of the film on the screen.  Polarized lenses worn by viewers help to create the impression of depth and dimension.

Three-layer color

Film with three layers of emulsion on a single strip of film.  Each layer is sensitive to one of the three primary colors of red, green, and blue.  Beginning in the early 1950s, color film work has been done primarily on three-layer, also called multilayer, film.  Frequently used three-layer color negative films are Eastman Color and Fuji Color.  A three-layer negative may be printed onto three-color separation master positives.  Brand names associated with this color separation process include Columbia Color and Supercinecolor.

Three-strip color

A color process in which three color separation negatives are produced on black and white film.  The process was introduced by Technicolor in 1932.  In the Technicolor three-strip color system, a prism divides the light from the camera lens to expose a green-sensitive negative film at one aperture, and two other superimposed negative films (known as a bipack) at the other aperture.  The bipack consists of a red-sensitive negative film and a blue-sensitive negative film with emulsion sides together.  When the color separation negatives are developed, the black and white images that are formed represent the color values of the photographed scenes divided into the three primary colors of red, green, and blue.  See also Three-color imbibition.

Tinted

An alteration of the film base by dipping the film in a bath of chemicals to get a dominant hue.  Later raw stock became available already tinted in several stock shades, including blue for moonlight and amber for firelight.  Tinting, as well as toning, were used to enhance early black and white films.

Tinted and toned

Color added to a black and white film by using a tinted base and a toned emulsion.

Title

A word, phrase, character, or group of characters, normally appearing in a work, naming the work.  See also Alternative title, Original release title, Parallel title, Supplied title, title proper.

Title bands/intertitle rolls

See Intertitle rolls/title bands.

Title proper

The chief name of a work, including any alternative title but excluding other title information.  For moving image works, the title proper is usually the original release title in the country of production and is usually used as the main entry.  See also Main entry.

Toned

A chemical alteration of film emulsion using metallic compounds.  The toned image differs from the tinted one in that the clear portions of the film remain unaffected.  Only the silver image of the positive film becomes colored, e.g., cyan toned, sepia toned.  Toning, as well as tinting, were used to enhance early black and white films.

Track

Optical or magnetic sound found on one edge of film stock or magnetic sound coating the entire film.

Trade name

A generic designation that is neither the actual name of a corporate body nor a specific series title, e.g., "A Triangle comedy."  A trade name is treated as a series-like phrase.

Trailers

Short advertisements shown in theaters for a forthcoming presentation, most commonly a feature film.  May include short segments of the feature advertised.  Also called a preview.  See also Television trailers.

Trailers, Television

See Television trailers.

Transliteration

Representation of text in the characters of another alphabet.  See also Romanization.

Triacetate film base

A cellulose acetate film base introduced by Kodak in 1948.  Triacetate base safety film became the industry standard for professional and amateur film and the manufacture of nitrate film was discontinued in the U.S. by 1952.  Currently manufactured safety base films are triacetate and polyester.  See also Acetate film base, Film base, Nitrate film base, Polyester film base, Safety film base.

Trims

Unused remnants cut from a shot in a film.  Trims may be carefully classified and put away as, in the progress of working from a rough cut towards a fine cut, they are often needed for incorporation in the film.  See also Outtakes.

Two-color

A non-specific term for a number of color processes in which the visible spectrum is divided into two color regions, e.g., blue-red, green-red.  For budgetary reasons, two-color processes continued to be used until the early 1950s even though the two components could not produce a full range of hues.  When three-layer film came into widespread use in the early 1950s, two-color processes became obsolete.

Two-color imbibition

A color process used to produce prints by transferring dye that has been soaked up by two matrices (gelatin relief images similar to lithographic printing plates).  The dye is transferred from the matrices to a special type of film.  The process was introduced by Technicolor in 1928.  See also Two-strip color.

Two-strip color

A color process in which two color separation negatives are produced on black and white film.  The visible spectrum is divided into the blue-green and orange-red regions.  Various two-strip color processes were used from the 1920s through the early 1950s, including Cinecolor, Magnacolor, Multicolor (very briefly), Technicolor (until ca. 1932), and Trucolor.  See also Two-color imbibition.

Type A

The SMPTE standard designation for an early 1 in. reel-to-reel videotape format introduced by Ampex in 1965.  Type C became far more widely used.

Type B

The SMPTE standard designation for a 1 in. reel-to-reel videotape format introduced by Bosch in 1975.  Type C became far more widely used.

Type C

The SMPTE standard designation for a 1 in. reel-to-reel videotape format introduced by Ampex and others in 1978.  Type C was a widely used broadcasting standard for approximately 10 years.

See also:

Glossary